TEN YEARS AFTER FIRST HITTING THE STANDS, THIS ARCHITECTURE & INTERIOR DESIGN MAGAZINE WAS LOOKING FOR A FACE LIFT.

With the publication industry feeling heat from the internet, a thorough re-positioning was in order for Home Review. After consulting with the Editor, we determined the magazine needed to embrace content generally not seen in architecture and interior design magazines. From urban planning to local second-hand antiques to street art, we repositioned content to appeal to cosmopolitan India's burgeoning 'design' mindset.

I developed guidelines for the face lift: word count of articles would plummet, photographs became bigger, and the magazine became more visual. Traditional captions were re-positioned, integrating them into the bodies of articles, which allows the eye to move playfully from photograph to content. 

Templates for each section of the magazine were created, giving each one a noticeably different structure, unexpected in contrast to the content before, but all tied down to a basic aesthetic.

Most pages have their photographs neatly aligned with a generous helping of white space. In locally-themed articles, the photographs come closer together and create a taste of chaos, reminiscent of Mumbai's architecture. 

The Green Section is printed on recycled paper. The Young Designer feature requires you to rotate the magazine to see the designer's portfolio. The aim was to make it a pleasure to flip from one page to the next.

Home Review redesigned is now more playful, more visual, and appeals to the instincts of young urban readers.

TEN YEARS AFTER FIRST HITTING THE STANDS, THIS ARCHITECTURE & INTERIOR DESIGN MAGAZINE WAS LOOKING FOR A FACE LIFT.

With the publication industry feeling heat from the internet, a thorough re-positioning was in order for Home Review. After consulting with the Editor, we determined the magazine needed to embrace content generally not seen in architecture and interior design magazines. From urban planning to local second-hand antiques to street art, we repositioned content to appeal to cosmopolitan India's burgeoning 'design' mindset.

I developed guidelines for the face lift: word count of articles would plummet, photographs became bigger, and the magazine became more visual. Traditional captions were re-positioned, integrating them into the bodies of articles, which allows the eye to move playfully from photograph to content. 

Templates for each section of the magazine were created, giving each one a noticeably different structure, unexpected in contrast to the content before, but all tied down to a basic aesthetic.

Most pages have their photographs neatly aligned with a generous helping of white space. In locally-themed articles, the photographs come closer together and create a taste of chaos, reminiscent of Mumbai's architecture. 

The Green Section is printed on recycled paper. The Young Designer feature requires you to rotate the magazine to see the designer's portfolio. The aim was to make it a pleasure to flip from one page to the next.

Home Review redesigned is now more playful, more visual, and appeals to the instincts of young urban readers.